English department handbook: schemes of work for year 7
other resources


THROUGHOUT YEAR SEVEN

Word and Sentence level objectives taught through starter activities and reinforced, where appropriate, during main activities

7.2. The Reading Passport and Information Retrieval Progress Unit


Weeks 1 - 8
7.1.' Skellig'
shared reading with workbook

Web-site materials, including print-friendly pdf document

Weeks 9 - 18
7.3. writing skills

Print-friendly pdf document


Weeks 19 - 22
7.4. development unit focusing on speaking and listening skills
four weeks
Print-friendly pdf document


Weeks 23 - 26
7.5. ‘Global Voices’:
an introduction to poetry from other cultures and traditions
three weeks
Print-friendly pdf document

Weeks 27 - 29
7.6. ‘Books in their times’:
an introduction to the literary heritage and to the study of English literature
three weeks
Print-friendly pdf document

Week 30
Year 7 tests

Weeks 31 - 34
7.7. What's in the News?

an introduction to the media and to the language of news reporting
four weeks
Print-friendly pdf document

Week 34
Year 7 tests

Weeks 35 - 39
7.8. Ballads and narrative poems:
to include a drama performance
seven weeks
Print-friendly pdf document


ENGLISH DEPARTMENT
KS3 SCHEME OF WORK YEAR 7

7.1 Modern novel for children - shared reading:
Skellig

Unit outline

ALL PUPILS MUST

discuss the structure, themes and methods of the novel, the issue of home education;

read the novel, Skellig, as a group;

write examples of descriptive, discursive, informative and poetic writing.

MOST PUPILS SHOULD


contribute purposefully to discussions about home education, about the structure of the novel and the gradual revelation of Skellig’s identity, and about the nature of surrealist art, using talk to clarify ideas;

listen to a talk or to a video about Blake, making notes and asking questions to clarify understanding;

read the selection of poems by Blake, the poems from which Almond makes quotations in the novel;

use the internet and reference books to research into birds and dinosaurs in order to produce a short piece about the history of the feather;

write an example of description, developing a Bible story about an angel into a more atmospheric short piece of writing;

plan, draft, revise and complete a piece of discursive writing on the debate for and against home schooling;

respond to a series of (Surrealist) paintings by writing poetry which employs dream-like imagery.

SOME PUPILS COULD

make presentations of the research work undertaken;

read more of Blake’s early, lyrical poems;

make fair copies of all the writing undertaken during this unit as a portfolio of work.

read other work (novels or short stories) by David Almond


National Literacy Strategy Framework Objectives

7.1 Modern novel for children - shared reading

1. Reading the novel en bloc
W3 Use writing to explore and develop ideas, eg journals, brain-storming techniques and mental-mapping activities

2. Early chapters: descriptive writing
R6 Adopt active reading approaches to engage with, and make sense of, texts, eg, visualising, predicting, empathising and relating to own experience
R12 Comment, using appropriate terminology, on how writers convey setting, character and mood through word-choice and sentence structure
R14 Recognise how writers’ language choices can enhance meaning eg repetition, emotive vocabulary, varied sentence structure or line length, sound effects
W3 Use writing to explore and develop ideas, eg journals, brain-storming techniques and mental-mapping activities
W14 Describe an object, person or setting in a way that includes relevant details and is accurate and evocative

3. Blake
R11 Recognise how print, sounds and still or moving images combine to create meaning
SL6 Listen for and recall the main points of a talk, reading or television programme, reflecting on what has been heard, to ask searching questions, make comments, or challenge the views expressed

4. Discursive writing about home education
S8 Recognise the cues to start a new paragraph and use the first sentence effectively to orientate the reader, eg when there is a shift of topic, viewpoint or time
S9 Identify the main point in a paragraph and how the supporting information relates to it, eg as illustration
S10 Recognise how sentences are organised in a paragraph in which the content is not chronological, eg by comparison
S12 Organise ideas into a coherent series of paragraphs, introducing, developing and concluding appropriately
S13f [Revise the stylistic conventions of] discursive writing, which signposts the organisation of contrasting points and clarifies the viewpoint
W1 Plan, draft, edit, revise, proof-read and present a text with readers and purpose in mind
W2 Collect, select and assemble ideas in a suitable planning format, eg flow chart, list, star-chart
W3 Use writing to explore and develop ideas, eg journals, brain-storming techniques and mental-mapping activities
W16 Find and use different ways to validate an argument, eg statistical evidence, exemplification and testimony
W21 Read accurately and use correctly vocabulary which relates to key concepts in each subject, distinguishing between everyday uses of words and their subject specific use, eg energy, resistance
SL5 Promote, justify or defend a point of view, using supporting evidence, example and illustration which are linked back to the main argument

5. Research project: the history of the feather

S8 Recognise the cues to start a new paragraph and use the first sentence effectively to orientate the reader, eg when there is a shift of topic, viewpoint or time
S9 Identify the main point in a paragraph and how the supporting information relates to it, eg as illustration
S12 Organise ideas into a coherent series of paragraphs, introducing, developing and concluding appropriately
W1 Plan, draft, edit, revise, proof-read and present a text with readers and purpose in mind
W2 Collect, select and assemble ideas in a suitable planning format, eg flow chart, list, star-chart
R1 Know how to locate resources for a given task and find relevant information in them, eg, skimming, use of index, glossary, key words, hot links
R2 Use appropriate reading strategies to extract particular information, eg highlighting, scanning
R3 Compare and contrast the ways information is presented in different forms, eg web page, diagrams, prose
R4 Make brief, clearly organised notes of key points for later use
R5 Appraise the value and relevance of information found and acknowledge sources

6. Dreams: truth and reality versus dreams

W8 Experiment with the visual and sound effects of language, including the use of imagery, alliteration, rhythm and rhyme
W9 Make links between reading of fiction, plays and poetry and the choices they make as writers
R11 Recognise how print, sounds and still or moving images combine to create meaning
R14 Recognise how writers’ language choices can enhance meaning eg repetition, emotive vocabulary, varied sentence structure or line length, sound effects

7. Final discussion on the gradual revelation of Skellig’s identity
R7 Identify the main points, processes or ideas in a text and how they are sequenced and developed by the writer
R8 Infer and deduce meanings using evidence in the text, identifying where and how meanings are implied
R15 Trace the ways in which a writer structures a text to prepare a reader for the ending, and comment on the effectiveness of the ending


Sequence of activities

1. Reading the novel en bloc.
resources: prompt sheet which suggests a variety

2. Early chapters: descriptive writing.
Read and analyse (as a model) the episode in Skellig with the finding of the angel and perhaps a comparison with comparable extracts from The Vintner’s Luck and The Body Artist. Write a descriptive and atmospheric version of a plain Bible story which includes angels (eg the annunciation, the empty tomb).
resources: extracts from text books (Skills in English, Collins English Framework); material from summer school; Bible stories about angels in a plain translation.

3. Blake poetry: listening, reading and discussion.
Watch video on Blake (Poetry Backpack); make notes on it, followed by discussion. Read selection of poems and discuss.
resources: video recording; prompt sheet to scaffold pupils’ notes; copies of Blake poems; prompt sheet to help teacher lead discussion.

4 . Discursive writing and debate about home schooling.
Pupils discuss issue, create concept-maps, plan essay using topic sentences, draft and redraft.
resources: writing frame

5. Research into the history of the feather.
Pupils research and plan a short piece for a junior school readership on the history of the feather
resources: internet webpages of collected material, supplemented as appropriate by books from school library

6 . Dream poetry: imaginative writing
Pupils, having discussed the role of dreams in the novel, and having looked at and discussed a selection of surrealist paintings, write poetry which creates dream-like effects.
resources: prompt sheet for teachers; exemplar poetry; collection of reproductions of Surrealist paintings (including some Blake).

7 . Gradual revelation of Skellig’s identity
Pupils discuss the shape of the novel and the way the reader is moved from the beginning to the end; the gradual revelation of Skellig’s identity.
resources: prompt sheet for teachers to help lead discussion




ENGLISH DEPARTMENT
KS 3 SCHEME OF WORK


YEAR 7
7.2. writing skills

Unit outline


ALL PUPILS MUST:

read and discuss
(at word level, sentence level and whole text level) a variety of texts in a number of key genres including a short story (writing which imagines, explores and entertains), some recipes (writing which informs, explains and describes), a diet leaflet or similar (writing which persuades, argues and advises) and a restaurant review (writing which analyses, reviews and comments) in order to learn about the distinctive features of this writing

plan, draft and write original work in each of these genres including a piece of such writing completed under examination conditions

write a ‘rain journal’ which provides opportunities for personal and expressive writing and for which they will need to have read examples of other journals and notebooks

MOST PUPILS SHOULD:

talk about their reading in pairs, in small groups and in whole class sessions write in a way which conveys meaning clearly and in a way which shows some features of the appropriate style for the topic

learn how to shape their writing to match the required genre


SOME PUPILS COULD:


read aloud their work and offer a commentary on how they tried to achieve relevant effects

provide examples from their own reading and research to supplement the work in the class

copy work out neatly by hand or using ICT for displays


YEAR 7
7.1. Introductory unit focusing on writing skills

Range of Skills

Writing

Pupils should be taught to draw on their reading and knowledge of linguistic and literary forms when composing their writing.

When writing to imagine, explore and entertain, pupils should be taught to draw on their experience of good fiction; to use imaginative vocabulary and varied linguistic and literary techniques; to exploit choice of language and structure to achieve particular effects and appeal to the reader; to use a range of techniques and different ways of organising and structuring material to convey ideas, themes and characters. Pupils should be taught the structure of whole texts, including cohesion, openings and conclusions.

When writing to inform, explain and describe, pupils should be taught to form sentences and paragraphs that express connections between information and ideas precisely; to use formal and impersonal language and concise expression; to consider what the reader needs to know and include relevant details; to present material clearly, using appropriate layout, illustrations and organisation. Pupils should be taught the structure of phrases and clauses and how they can be combined to make complex sentences.

When writing to persuade, argue and advise, pupils should be taught to develop logical arguments and cite evidence; to use persuasive techniques and rhetorical devices; to anticipate reader reaction, counter opposing views and use language to gain attention and sustain interest.

When writing to analyse, review and comment, pupils should be taught to reflect on the nature and significance of the subject matter; to form their own view, taking into account a range of evidence and opinions; to organise their ideas and information, distinguishing between analysis and comment; to take account of how well the reader knows the topic. Pupils should be taught paragraph structure and how to form different types of paragraph.

Pupils should be taught to plan, draft, redraft and proofread their work on paper and screen. Pupils should be taught to write with fluency and, when required, with speed. In presenting final polished work, pupils should be taught to ensure that work is neat and clear; to write legibly (if their work is handwritten), and to make full use of different presentational devices where appropriate.

Pupils should also be taught to use writing for thinking and learning.


ENGLISH DEPARTMENT
YEAR SEVEN: IMPROVING YOUR WRITING SKILLS


This unit focuses on writing. You will be asked to complete a number of key writing tasks.

You will read a short story. You will talk about how the story is told: how a sense of place and time is created; how characters are introduced; how things get complicated and how they end up. Then, in a small group, you will write a story of your own. You yourself will be in charge of just one part of this final story.

You will read some recipes. You will have to imagine using the recipes to prepare some food. You will be asked to write clear and accurate reports on this imaginary cooking!

You will look at leaflets which give advice about health and people’s lifestyles. You will also read some factual material about diets. Then you will have to write your own persuasive leaflet about a healthy diet.

The fourth piece of writing will be about restaurants. You will read newspaper articles which review food in expensive restaurants. Then you will write about a meal you have eaten - perhaps at home, perhaps in school - in the style of a newspaper review.

Finally you will do a short test of writing to show that your writing skills have improved by doing this work. Your teacher will give your term’s work a mark, and make suggestions about how to continue your improvement next time.


7.2. Writing to imagine explore and entertain


Learning Objectives

to appreciate the structure of a piece of narrative writing:
an arresting opening;
a developing plot;
a complication;
a crisis;
a satisfying resolution;

to be able to write imaginatively with accuracy, control and some originality.

Suggested Activities

reading The Coronation Mob;
analysing the story into the ‘S’ pattern;

collaboratively planning a story with these features;

working in small groups on the separate features (one group per feature);

working in (new) small groups on the complete story: revising and harmonising;

producing a matrix of units as a display which can be read in many ways;

groups prepare readings from the matrix and talk about their choices


Resources

copies of Nothing to be Afraid Of


Learning Outcomes

notes in exercise book;

one feature of the story written out as a final draft in exercise books
the ability to write using a narrative style even in examination conditions.

7.2. Writing to inform, explain and describe

Learning Objectives

to appreciate the way in which recipes explain and describe

the effect of using a mixture of simple and complex sentences in writing a report

Suggested Activities

reading examples of recipes and discussing what they have in common and the stylistic differences they demonstrate

pupils can compare two (out of three) examples, perhaps working in pairs, using differentiated worksheets;

having read the recipes, pupils write a report of their (imagined) preparation on the dish
(showing conversion of the imperative mood (present tense) to the past tense, for example;

pupils write one report in which all sentences are simple and another in which all sentences are complex;

In pairs they discuss differences in the two accounts and use elements from them to write a final ‘best’ account.

Resources

photocopied examples of recipes

Learning Outcomes

pupils should be able to recognise and change the tense of verbs and to recognise the imperative mood of the verb

pupils should be able to see the difference between simple and complex sentences

pupils should be able - even under exam conditions - to write a clear report varying sentence structure to maintain the reader’s interest

7.2. Writing to persuade, argue and advise

Learning Objectives

to recognise the way in which language and presentation can be used to persuade,
at word level, for example, the use of emotive language, of the imperative and of contrasts; at sentence level, for example, the use of exaggerated statements, of opinion presented as facts, of a sense of climax, and at whole text level, for example, layout and the balance of words and images, the movement from problem to solution (what we must do in response to the article);

to understand the difference between fact and opinion;

to read an article for information and to be able to summarise this information for their own purposes.

Suggested Activities

reading examples of persuasive lifestyle leaflets and discussing their techniques and effects;

use appropriate articles as a source of information for a lifestyle (diet) leaflet of their own;

to prepare a final copy of a persuasive leaflet.

Resources

photocopied examples of persuasive ‘lifestyle’ leaflets (E1)

photocopied articles about a healthy diet (E1)

Learning Outcomes

pupils should be able to recognise persuasive techniques in writing and to talk about them;

pupils should be able to see the difference between fact and opinion

pupils should be able - even under exam conditions - to write a clear piece of persuasive writing which uses language (and possibly presentational devices) to help it persuade.

7.2. Writing to analyse, review and comment

Learning Objectives

to appreciate the style in which newspaper journalists write reviews

to appreciate and be able to use humour in writing

the importance of drafting and redrafting

Suggested Activities

reading examples of restaurant reviews, distinguishing fact from opinion and analysis from comment;

drawing up a style checklist for food journalists;

pupils draft, discuss and redraft a review of a meal they have eaten;

they make a fair copy (possibly using ICT).

Resources

photocopied examples of restaurant reviews (E1)

Learning Outcomes

pupils should be able to discuss features of style at both sentence level and word level

pupils should be able to see the difference between fact and opinion and between analysis and comment

pupils should be able - even under exam conditions - to write a clear review which combines analysis and comment in an appropriate style

7.2. Writing to think and learn
The Rain Diary


Learning Objectives

to learn how writing can be used to record and develop thoughts, ideas and feelings

Suggested Activities

On wet days, pupils will not use the first ten minutes of their lessons for language study nor for anything else, but will, instead, write an entry for their ‘rain journal’ on a page of their exercise books.

In order to prepare for this, on the first wet day of the term, the class will spend a lesson reading and discussing a selection of journal entries before writing their first ‘rain journal’ entry during the last ten minutes of the lesson (even if by then it has stopped raining!)

Resources

for the initial lesson, photocopied examples of journals to read and discuss (E1)

for subsequent lessons, rain

Learning Outcomes

pupils should be able to see how writing can help them clarify thoughts

pupils should begin to recognise the potential of language for developing ideas and for expressing feelings

on wet days pupils should have some fun with their writing



ENGLISH DEPARTMENT

YEAR SEVEN:
IMPROVING WRITING SKILLS

END OF UNIT TEST


This test is to be completed on a clean page of your exercise book.

Choose one of the following tasks and answer it carefully. Your teacher will make it clear exactly how much time you have.


1. A story. When you and your family arrive at a holiday cottage for Christmas with another family, you discover a problem. Write about your arrival and how you discover and solve the problem.


2. A report. You have been on a trip to London or to another big city. You have been asked to write a report on it for a class magazine. Write the report. Make sure you choose carefully the things you report on. Give interesting details and information, not just a list.


3. Persuasive writing. Your school is running a sponsored walk to raise money for a hospital in Kenya where sick young mothers are looked after and fed properly. Write a leaflet that will be given to all the forms in the school which encourages pupils to take part in the walk or to sponsor a friend.


4. A review. Which is the best lesson you have had this term? It doesn’t have to be an English lesson! Write a review of the lesson in which you describe what happened and make your own comments about why it was a successful lesson.



ENGLISH DEPARTMENT
KS 3 SCHEME OF WORK


YEAR 7
7.3. development unit focusing on speaking and listening skills
four weeks

Unit outline

ALL PUPILS MUST:

participate confidently in discussion with familiar groups

MOST PUPILS SHOULD:

talk and listen confidently, adapting their speech successfully in different groupings; in speaking to the whole class they use some features of formal spoken English and are aware of some differences between speech and writing

SOME PUPILS COULD:

ask questions and make points which move the discussion forward; they describe and explain differences in formality

YEAR 7
7.3. Development unit focusing on speaking and listening skills

Range of Skills

Speaking and Listening

Pupils will use talk to describe, narrate and explain and to explore, debate and analyse; they will make extended contributions to talk in different contexts and groups; they will give presentations to different audiences. Pupils will listen to live talk, presentations, discussions and tape-recordings. They will be asked to take different roles in groups; to improvise and work ‘in role’; to discuss and review their own and others’ performances.

Pupils will learn about language in understanding some of the differences between speech and writing and in analysing the variations in written standard English and how they differ from spoken language.

Reading

Pupils, in the course of this unit, will read examples of literary non-fiction, autobiography, media texts and newspaper articles.

Writing

Pupils will write to inform, describe and explain, focusing on conveying information and ideas clearly.


ENGLISH DEPARTMENT

YEAR SEVEN:
DEVELOPING YOUR SPEAKING AND LISTENING SKILLS


This unit focuses on speaking and listening. You will be asked to complete a number of key tasks.

You will keep a speaking and listening diary which will help you understand what it is to be ‘good’ at speaking and listening and to improve your own work. You will work on devising a poster which explains what exactly effective talk is.

You will interview someone - a friend or a relative - about their experience of school. You will also read some examples of writers remembering their schooldays. This will enable you and the class to discuss the differences between speech and writing. You will then write a short article on schooling.

There will be some short drama activities: you will be asked to improvise an incident and present a freeze frame.

Finally you will be asked to look back over your speaking and listening work and draw up a target sheet for you to bear in mind during your work in English after Christmas.


7.3. Development unit focusing on speaking and listening skills

Learning Objectives

to evaluate talk and to be able to adapt to a range of situations;

to ask questions and offer comments which are relevant and helpful;

to take different views into account and modify views in the light of what others say;

to write in a way which considers what the reader needs to know and which includes relevant details;

to present written material clearly, using appropriate layout and organisation.

Suggested Activities

1. What does it mean to be good at speaking & listening?

make notes with the class about some features of good speaking and listening: eg ask questions for clarification, persuasion, checking you have been understood

Pupils keep speaking and listening diaries analysing talk inside and outside school: audience, purpose, context. Provide a grid or guidelines. Discuss in class, with small groups then sorting activities listed in diaries into different groups according to audience, purpose, etc. Bring out ideas of varying language choice in these situations.
Groups draw up posters summarising findings : discussion, interviews, drama.

Resources

extracts from autobiography (including Cider with Rosie), newspaper reports, short transcripts of speech (E1)

Learning Outcomes

speaking and listening diary in exercise book;

pupils work in small groups, taking role as chair, scribe, etc, as required

the ability to ask questions, make comments, select material, develop discussion to a conclusion


7.3. Development unit focusing on speaking and listening skills

Learning Objectives


to undertake an interview

to understand some of the differences between speaking and writing

to write an account showing an understanding of what a reader needs to know and of how to include relevant details

Suggested Activities

2. Discuss with class the differences between present and previous schools;

read a few extracts from autobiographical writing which describe the experience of schooling;

prepare pupils to interview an older member of the family (or neighbour) about school, including first day, teachers, etc: open ended questions, follow-up questions, politeness, how to show attentive listening; agree on how notes are going to be taken. (Practise with teacher in role?)

Groups discuss and analyse findings.

Look at transcripts of speech and discuss differences between speech and writing.

Pupils write a short, formal article to explain an describe how others’ schooling differs from their own.

Resources

photocopied transcripts of speech
(E1)

Learning Outcomes

pupils can speak and listen and take notes purposefully in an unfamiliar situation

pupils understand how changes need to be made to spoken language if it is to become acceptable as a piece of formal writing

pupils can write appropriately and interestingly conveying information clearly and concisely

7.3. Development unit focusing on speaking and listening skills

Learning Objectives

to use dramatic conventions to explore ideas and issues;

to evaluate critically the intentions and performance of drama;


































Suggested Activities

3. Introduce a typical classroom event, eg arrival of new pupil; ask pupils on groups to improvise a short scene (5 mins) on this topic which explores attitudes and behaviour;

two groups present their scenes; focus discussion on the effectiveness in creating sympathy for characters, conveying a key moment, reaching a conclusion.

ask pupils to improve their scenes and to prepare a freeze frame of a key moment;

each group presents a freeze frame - discuss use of gesture, space and grouping to convey relationships and attitudes.









Resources













































Learning Outcomes

pupils should be able to use some dramatic techniques

pupils should be able to recognise, describe and evaluate some strengths of each others’ performances and the ways they could be improved



























7.3. Development unit focusing on speaking and listening skills

Learning Objectives

to make different types of contributions to groups;

to sift, summarise and use salient points;

to evaluate the effectiveness of their talk
































Suggested Activities

4. Pupils use the posters created earlier to discuss the quality of their work in this unit;

in class discussion review the range of speaking and listening activities in the unit

pupils write (in lieu of a ‘test’ unit) a self evaluation identifying targets for improvement in each area of oral work, specifying strengths and some weaknesses and setting specific targets.

Pupils may need help with the nature of appropriate targets.















Resources













































Learning Outcomes



Pupils are able to conduct a self evaluation identifying targets for improvement in each area of oral work, specifying strengths and some weaknesses and setting specific targets.




















ENGLISH DEPARTMENT
KS3 SCHEME OF WORK

YEAR 7
7.4. ‘Global Voices’:
An introduction to poetry from other cultures and traditions

3 Weeks

Unit Outline


ALL PUPILS MUST:

read and discuss (at word level, sentence level and whole text level) a variety of poetry from other cultures and traditions, focusing on a sense of place and recognising some themes and concerns in writing from a range of cultures

write a fact file about their local community in which they consider their own culture

write a poem about their own culture


MOST PUPILS SHOULD:

recognise that writing from all cultures has distinctive themes and concerns, some of which are shared with other cultures

identify some non-standard forms and explain why they are used.

write clearly and with expression, successfully establishing a sense of place in their own poem


SOME PUPILS COULD:

explain how themes, concerns and language may vary in literature from different cultures, articulating a response in speech and writing

read aloud their work and offer a commentary on how they tried to achieve certain effects

copy work neatly by hand or using ICT for displays



ENGLISH DEPARTMENT
YEAR SEVEN:
AN INTRODUCTION TO POETRY FROM OTHER CULTURES



This unit focuses on poetry from all around the word, looking at different cultures and traditions.

You will read a variety of different poems by authors such as Grace Nichols, Seamus Heaney, Bedri Rahmi Eyuboglu, Dom Moraes, Po Chu-I and Fred D’Aguiar. You will talk and write about the people and places presented in the poems; the thoughts and feelings of the poet; and the language, moods and themes of the poems.

You will talk about the meaning of the word ‘culture’. You will then talk about the cultures described in the poems. You will compare the different cultures in all the poems you have read.

You will then write a fact file about your local community listing the tourist attractions, sites of natural or historical interest and different local communities and dialects in the area in which you live. You will then discuss your own culture and consider how it is made up.

Your final piece of writing will be a poem about your own culture. You can use your fact file about your local community to help you as well as the other poetry you have already studied. When you have completed the first draft of your poem, you will read it to a partner, a small group, or even to the rest of the class if you are feeling brave! You will then make improvements to your poem based on the response of the audience.











7.4 Global Voices: Part one - other cultures one to two weeks

Learning Objectives

to describe, appreciate and interpret a variety of poems at word level, for example, by studying the vocabulary and grammar of standard English and dialectical variation; at sentence level, for example, recognising the imagery used to describe a person or place; and at whole text level, for example, recognising how techniques, structure, forms and styles vary.

to learn the distinctiveness of literature from different traditions.

to learn how familiar themes are explored in different cultural contexts.










Suggested Activities

reading and discussing a variety of poetry from other cultures in pairs, small groups and whole-class sessions, focusing on: the poets’ thoughts and feelings, the images of people and places presented, how language and form are used to express thoughts and emotions about the place, whether the poems are successful in conveying mood and theme.

making notes about each poem using the headings: Tone, Form, Language.

writing a paragraph on each of the two most interesting and enjoyable poems drawing on notes and discussion.










Resources


photocopies of ‘Gone Away’ by Dom Moraes, ‘Island Man’ by Grace Nichols, ‘The Saga of Istanbul’ by Bedri Rahmi Eyuboglu, ‘Digging’ by Seamus Heaney (Also see ‘The Graballe Man’ and ‘The Forge’).

‘Lazy Man’s Song’ by Po Chu-I and ‘Mama Dot’ by Fred D’Aguiar’ are in the 1996 NEAB Anthology which also includes poetry and background information (p.88) of several other poets that could also be used.


















Learning Outcomes

pupils should be able to:

discuss the ways in which poets suggest a sense of a particular culture or place, e.g. through use of non-standard forms

identify specific techniques used by poets and make simple links to effects achieved

understand the poems’ content and themes and identify similarities/differences in their own experiences

articulate a personal response to poems that shows some understanding of cultural differences








7.4 Global Voices – Part two: our culture one to two weeks

Learning Objectives

to recognise cultural richness in our own community

writing to imagine, explore, entertain: to write a poem about our community experimenting with the visual and sound effects of language including the use of imagery, alliteration, rhyme and rhythm

to test the quality of written work by using it with an audience and refining it in the light of feedback




















Suggested Activities

discussing the word ‘culture’ and deciding the elements that make up our own culture

creating a fact file about the local community by brainstorming features particular to the local area e.g. tourist attractions, sites of natural or historical interest, variety of local communities and dialects.

working in small groups on the chosen categories

writing a poem about our own culture using the fact file as a starting point for ideas and aiming to create a sense of place

reading ‘The Saga of Istanbul’ and using it to create a poem of their own, with each stanza beginning with a variation of the original’s

reading the first draft of the poem to a partner, small group or the class and re-drafting it following feedback














Resources


Tourist Information leaflets of the local area








































Learning Outcomes

pupils should be able to:

understand the meaning of the word ‘culture’ and recognise what makes up their own

write clearly and imaginatively about their own culture successfully creating a sense of place

read aloud their own poem clearly and with expression


 

Other Resources

Bold National Literacy Strategy Objectives for Year Seven

Some word level starters

Some sentence level starters

Some whole text level starters